Giving feedback can feel vulnerable. It takes courage to offer feedback.

Receiving feedback can also feel vulnerable. If, when you are receiving feedback you feel threatened, you may be more concerned with surviving the feedback than with hearing exactly what is being said.

To minimize your perception of threat or criticism when receiving feedback, follow the G.I.F.T. model when receiving feedback.

G.I.F.T.

Gracious Gratitude for the Gift. See the feedback as a Gift and Graciously receive it with Gratitude.  Appreciate and acknowledge the courage it took for the feedback provider to bring it to you.

What is the gift in this feedback?

What do I appreciate about this feedback?

What do I appreciate about the person who brought me the feedback?

Inquire to learn more about what the feedback provider sees and how you can improve.  Listen and learn from curiosity.

What questions do I have about the feedback?

How can I ask from curiosity and humility?

What can I learn about myself, my processes, my attitude, my team?

Find it and Follow up. Find what the feedback provider is bringing you.   Use the feedback to discover more about how you are perceived and how you can improve.  Then Follow up with the provider of the feedback after you have had time to implement change to see if they have noticed improvement.

How is this feedback accurate?

How could the feedback provider have perceived what they saw?

Set a reminder to follow up after making changes.

Thank and Think. Thank the person who brought you the feedback.  Think about the ways that you can improve.

What is one way I can improve?  What is one thing I can change?

Ask the provider for feedback on your ideas about how to improve.

How can you best express your authentic appreciation?

The other side of receiving feedback artfully is giving feedback that people appreciate.  Read more about how to give great feedback in my blog post,  5 Rs to Remember When Giving Feedback.

In my team building communication workshops, we discuss giving and receiving feedback, the art of listening, shifting from victim to creator, asking good questions, asking for help and saying no.  If you would like to learn more about how I can help your team with empowering workshops, please contact me.

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons